Dance Your PhD: Modeling the Perceptual Learning of Novel Dialect Features

Today’s blog post is a bit different. It’s in dance!

If that wasn’t quite clear enough for you, you can check this blog post for a more detailed explanation.

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Where can you find language data on the web?

In the course of my day-to-day work on Kaggle’s public data platform, I’ve learned a lot about the ecosystem of language data on the web (or at least the portions of it that have been annotated in English). For example, I’ve noticed a weird disconnect between European and American data repositories  resources that I’m pretty sure has its roots in historical and disciplinary divisions.

Computer Used to Create Printouts of Data (FDA 097) (8250815324)

I’ve also found a lot of great resources, though! At some point, I started keeping notes on interesting data repositories and link aggregators. I finally got around to tidying up and annotating my list of resources, and I figured that it would a useful thing to share with everyone. So, without further ado, here’s an (incomplete) list of some places to find language resources on the web:

  • META-SHARE
    • URL :http://www.meta-share.org/
    • META-SHARE has a lot of resources from The International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC) on it.
  • Trolling
  • Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC)
    • URL: https://www.ldc.upenn.edu/
    • The Linguistic Data Consortium is an international non-profit that offers archival hosting of datasets. The data offered by them is high quality and usually not free (although they offer data grants for students).
  • Kaggle
    • URL: https://www.kaggle.com/datasets?search=corpus
    • Kaggle’s public data platform has a lot of language/NLP datasets available on it, many not in English. You can also do data analysis on Kaggle (with R or Python) without having to download anything or set up a local environment.
  • European Language Resources Association
  • Zenodo
    • URL: https://zenodo.org/
    • Hosted by CERN, has datasets (including corpora) from a wide variety of disciplines.
  • Document the Now
    • URL: http://www.docnow.io/catalog/
    • Contains lists of Tweet ID’s surrounding certain events. You’ll need to use the “rehydrator” to get the actual tweets.
  • International Standard Language Resource Number
    • URL: http://www.islrn.org/resources/identify_name/  (a list of unique ID #’s associated with language resources)
    • Like a digital object identifier (DOI) for language resources. Not the best search (only looks at the title)  but if you have a specific phrase you’re looking for it can be a good way to discover new resources.
  • Language & Culture Archives (SIL)
  • Open Language Archives Community (OLAC)
  • Free sound
  • GitHub
    • URL:  https://github.com/search?q=corpus
    • You can sometimes find interesting & high quality language data on Github, but it’s not centralized and of widely varying quality.
  • Re3data.org
  • Language Gold Mine

Know of a resource I forgot to include? Link it in the comments!